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Famoso – The Annex

Posted on July 9, 2012 by in The Annex

Famoso The Annex

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2 Stars

- Walk in to Famoso’s new Annex location and there is no mistaking the kind of restaurant you have entered: a popular, loud hang out for students, families and friends alike. It’s a casual place with daily deals (movies, cheap wine on Wednesdays, etc.), TVs showing Blue Jays’ games and young staff working feverishly to keep up with the sit-in and take-out clientele.  It’s got a pleasant, relaxed vibe and people seemed to be rather enjoying themselves.

Once seated in our booth, we perused the menu and our lovely server explained how the restaurant works: you write down your order on the notepad provided, bring it up to the counter and hand it in. You can either pay right away or begin a tab. Any subsequent orders can be placed through the wait staff. I assume this method is effective for those in a hurry, but it did seem a little odd considering how often our server checked in on us. She also expounded upon the “red sauce” pizzas made with Campania tomato sauce, fior-de-latte mozzarella, basil and pecorino romano cheese. (The “white sauce”pizzas are made with a garlic and olive oil sauce instead of the tomatoes.)

We opted for the prosciutto-wrapped mozzarella balls for an appetizer, the funghi tartufo and San Andreas pizzas and, for dessert, the dolce and banana dish. As with any self-respecting pizza place, they had San Pellegrino on the menu so got an Aranciata (my fave) and a Limonata. My dining companion kindly took the order the counter while I scoped out the huge place before me. Famoso has really nice exposed brick walls, comfortable booths and, by my count, at least three staff members per table. There are a lot of eyes on tables and not much gets missed. The staff is universally nice, if perhaps inexperienced. It lacked a certain finesse, but made up for it in sweet charm.

Our appetizer arrived and I’m glad we asked for salt, pepper and chili flakes. The mozzarella balls were tasty, but the red sauce (which would appear later on our funghi pizza) was very, very sweet. For my liking, too sweet.  A dash of salt and some chili flakes were necessary and helped considerably. I was hoping for crispier prosciutto, too; as a start to the meal, it was pretty average. If you’re going to get an appetizer, I would recommend you try a salad. They looked fresh and tasty.

Our funghi  tartufo pizza arrived fairly shortly afterward. It consisted of roasted white mushrooms, oyster mushrooms, truffle oil and parmiggiano reggiano.  Again, it was better with the salt and chili flakes.  The crusts at Famoso are a bit thicker than is the trend right now, but I liked the chewier texture. I only wish that this pizza had been left in the 900-degree oven a little longer as it needed a little more crispiness to counter the soft, melting cheese that was starting to soak through the crust. (A note: I took a slice of this one home and had it two days later. I have to say, it tasted much better as a leftover!)

Our second pizza – the San Andreas – was a “New World Pizza” with a white sauce, chili-lime marinated chicken and fresh mozzarella. It was then baked and topped with avocado slices, diced roma tomatoes, onion, cilantro, a drizzle of cream and a lime wedge. Certainly not traditional, but pretty darned tasty. The pizza seemed to have stayed in the oven just that little bit longer and had that nice char on the bottom. The lime juice provided a bright flavour and the chicken was tender. (I’d have liked a little more chicken, but that’s a bit of a nitpick. It was a good pizza.) Were I to go back, I would steer my companions toward it if they wanted to try something a little different.

Finally, dessert. This was my favourite dish of the four we tried. A long, rectangular plate of roasted bananas coated in caramelized brown sugar, topped with pecans and caramel sauce and a scoop of ice cream in the middle arrived at the table and my eyes widened. This looked and smelled fantasti and tasted even better. The bananas were piping hot and creamy and contrasted beautifully with the crunch of the sugar and the chill of the ice cream. That dish was devoured in what had to be record time.

Overall, Famoso is…fine. There isn`t anything in particular that stands out but there isn’t anything egregiously wrong with it, either.  It caters to a wide variety of tastes so it is sure to be a good option if you are going out with a group with varying tastes or dietary restrictions or preferences. Do not bother with the prosciutto-wrapped mozzarella balls, but do not skip dessert.

- Carolyn

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Khao San Road

Posted on March 30, 2012 by in Downtown

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2 Stars

- Here is the best advice I can provide if you’re thinking about heading to Khao San Road:

1. Make reservations. Arrive early. Since it opened, this place has gotten great buzz for providing authentic, flavourful Thai food. As a result, people from all over the city have been flocking to this casual downtown joint for lunch and dinner. (They also do take out orders.) My friend and I arrived at 6pm on a Thursday and the place was already almost full: tables of two and four, plus the larger tables at the front that could be utilized for larger parties or cafeteria-style seating and the bar were occupied by a mix of couples, friends and colleagues from the surrounding businesses. While we waited to be seated, I noticed a sheet of laminated paper at the host’s stand imploring potential, hungry customers to be patient while waiting for a table to become available.

2. Come hungry. Portions are more than reasonable and priced accordingly. We were starving and decided to try a number of dishes and split them between us: cold rolls filled with home-made chicken sausage, lettuce, carrots, mint leaves and Thai basil (Po Pia Pak Sod Gai Yaw); crispy squash fritters (Gra Bong); a curry dish with bell and hot peppers, kaffir lime leaves and the ubiquitous Thai basil (Gaeng Panang); pad Thai; and a house specialty of stir-fried minced beef with holy basil, topped with a fried egg (Pad Gra Pra). We also ordered the only beer available, Singha. Not entirely sure why there is only one, but it’s a light, refreshing beer, and I had no complaints about it.

3. Temper your expectations. The food at Khao San Road is good, yes, but it was not exemplary. It wasn’t bad by any means, but I had very high expectations that were sadly unmet. The exception was the Pad Gra Pra which was very, very good. It’s a house specialty so if you go, you might be best to stick with the items on that particular part of the menu. There was nothing wrong with the food in particular; however, after hearing such glowing reviews from both friends and reviews, I was anticipating more.

Additionally, we found the service lacking. Our order was taken promptly and our first round of drinks appeared in short order. The problems started when food began to arrive at our fairly small table faster than we could eat. I pointed this out to our server who shrugged and kept piling on the plates. Once we had all our food, our server disappeared, a problem on two fronts: we had no room to maneuver and we wanted another round of Singhas. We were able to flag her down eventually and we were served with much reluctance from that point.

Khao San Road is not a bad restaurant by any stretch. The food is better than average but not spectacular. Stick with the house specialties and you’ll likely do well. If you’re going to go in for a sit-down meal, reservations are a must. Better yet, call ahead for take-out and have a couple of beers ready to go at home.

- Carolyn

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Hey Meatball

Posted on November 10, 2011 by in Little Italy

Hey Meatball

2 stars

- Hey Meatball; Hey Mediocre. Walking into Hey Meatball instantly feels like you are walking into your old high school cafeteria. A few two and four person tables are set up, and there’s one long 16 person table down the middle, all this in a space that was clearly not built for this many diners. I wasn’t entirely sure if we were to seat ourselves or wait for direction. We inquired with the cashier/order taker/owner to find out. I know he was the owner because he told us.

For a restaurant that serves all meatballs, all the time, we were surprised to find that there were only three entrée selections on the chalk board and a few side dishes to choose from. Of the four side dishes, two had already been crossed out for the day, leaving a side salad or butternut squash soup. I decided to order the vegetarian eggplant ‘meatballs’ with polenta and parmesan, and my dining partner ordered the Porky  meatballs, (a combination of pork and ground beef) with tomato sauce on spaghetti. Immediately I was told that they were out of polenta and was asked “what would I like it on?” Unsure of my options, even after asking, I replied with “spaghetti,” as that was the only thing on the chalkboard that I was sure that they had in stock.

We each ordered a homemade cream soda, we were given a number, and we took a seat. Our number was called out about 10 minutes later, and we immediately noticed the disparity in portion size. My eggplant ‘meatballs’ were served on a huge swirl of very al dente spaghetti, whereas the porky meatballs arrived on what could be considered an order from the children’s menu- if there was one that is.

The food was good, but not great. The eggplant ‘meatballs’ had a nice consistency, and were spicy and full of flavor. The tomato sauce that the dish was served with was hearty and not too salty, however I thought that the pasta could have been cooked a little more. The Porky meatballs were excellent, the combination of pork and beef proved to be a hit, however we both found that the tomato sauce served with the meatballs was far too sweet for the savory nature of the dish.

The saving grace of the meal was the amazing cream sodas they make fresh on site. They were a throwback to the Jones cream soda that you used to drink as a kid, but without too much fizz. Unfortunately, when the beverage you order to go with your meal is the best part of the experience, you know that there is something missing.

Hey Meatball is missing the warm and friendly atmosphere you would expect to find in a restaurant with a wide open kitchen, communal tables and a chef that endeavors to use ingredients within a 100-mile radius of Toronto. All great qualities to have in a unique restaurant with a unique concept, but here, it just didn’t seem to create anything memorable. There was no music playing while we were in, the fluorescent lighting was a little harsh on the eyes, and gruff reception made Hey Meatball just another mediocre dining experience.

- Janine

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Souz Dal

Posted on August 20, 2011 by in Little Italy

2 stars

- Alright, alright, so as it turns out I sometimes judge a book by its cover.  Or, in this case, a bar by its’ signage.  Let’s face it, I’m a sucker for good signage.  And Souz Dal has it.  The rusty globe hangs outside like a relic, the name of the bar cut into the side.  Lit, and glowing from within, it reminds me of one of those tin punch-out crafts made from a (insert random legume) can at summer camp.  But much cooler of course.  It was this sign that caught my attention on more than one occasion, beckoning me in when I had somewhere else to be.  Finally, one night a couple of weeks ago, I gave in to its sirens call.  I was a little bit disappointed.

It was devoid of people save for us and the lonely bartender.  I say lonely, but judging by his charm (see: none) he probably liked it better that way.  Granted though, it was early – Souz Dal only has a drink menu – and a few more folk trickled in as the night wore on.

The stars I gave are attributed solely to the bar’s ambience.  Dimly lit, and painted in muted reds and oranges it has an earthy or Moorish feel to it.  Worn textiles and cathedral mirrors adorn the walls, while candles flicker on every table, casting shadows.  The back patio has a similar vibe happening, cloistered in by high walls, and lit by candles wedged in the mouths of old wine bottles.

Now I rarely turn down a good patio, but in this case I chose a seat inside, which says a lot.  Reclined on velvet benches at our table by the open front window, we watched College Street come alive as we perused the drink menu. I was in a cocktail mood, and my friend had read somewhere that Souz Dal claimed to have the “best” mojitos in the city, so that was the first order I placed.

Now I’ve been to Cuba.  I did a little backpacking, starting in Havana and making my way to the South coast.  I wouldn’t say I’m a connoiseur of the mojito because of this, but I did drink my fair share, and like to think I know a thing or two about a good one. And this wasn’t one of them.  There wasn’t nearly enough mint or sugar, so it was overwhelmingly bitter.  I don’t like my mojitos to taste like Kool-Aid, but I do like a little sweetness to curb the edge.

Unlikely to order another of the same, but unwilling to give up on the bar, we tried a few other beverages.  Nothing wowed us.  The Moscow Mule with its ginger beer offered a nice slow burn, but it also wasn’t a repeat offender. The fortune cookie garnish on the lychee-infused Soho martini was fun, but not nearly as tasty as a lychee would have been.

Although funky signage and ambience mean a lot to me, a good drink means even more, so chances are I won’t be returning to Souz Dal.  If however, you are in the market for an intimate date setting (see: empty bar) then head on over.  And if a mediocre mojito is your thing, then you can get them here for $5.75 on Mondays.

- Rebecca

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Drake BBQ – Revisted

Posted on April 14, 2011 by in Liberty Village

2 stars

- If you’ve already read our first review of Drake BBQ, then you’ll know that they didn’t exactly impress the first time around. If you haven’t read it yet, I suggest you do. In any case, everyone deserves a second chance…

So, I wiped Drake BBQ’s slate clean and went with a clear mind that was free of any preconceived notions of what the food or service would be like.

After my visit, I decided to up Drake BBQ’s review to two stars, for one main reason in particular; I considered my encounter with the staff a drastic improvement from what Andre experienced a few weeks ago.

That said, when I first entered this tiny restaurant, I immediately thought I was in for much of the same. There weren’t any other people there, yet I hardly received a glance, much less a hello. However, once I stopped for to look at the menu hanging on the wall the guy behind the counter engaged me in the regular shtick, with a “how are you doing…” “what can I get for you…” and “may I recommend the pork.” Okay, okay, it’s not the most glaring example of good customer service, but I certainly didn’t feel unwelcome, and the employee helped where he could.

Now, I will deal with lackluster staff if the food is spectacular. Really, I don’t care much who is behind the counter if I’m handed a plate of something truly delicious – at least the attitude is well earned. Though, I’m sad to say that I have to agree with the Andre’s review of the food. I may never have been to Texas, but I have had good BBQ, and this just isn’t it.

All of my fond experiences of BBQ are owed to two important factors: an unbelievably tender meat, and a deep, smoky sauce smothering it. At Drake BBQ, I ordered the Texas chopped beef brisket combo with a side of coleslaw (other side options are peanuts, chips or pickles). When I took my first bite of the beef, I was momentarily excited by a hefty charcoal flavour that was seemingly infused in it. Unfortunately, it didn’t carry through the whole sandwich. When there is a true-master behind the grill, you’ll get something that has a deep flavour running through and through, not just on the crust of the meat. The rest of the beef was actually quite boring, bland, and dry. Truth be told, I actually saw another diner go up and ask for salt…ouch!

I know the sauce was a point of contention last time, and I’m sad to say again, I also wasn’t impressed with it. BBQ should leave your face splattered and your hands tacky from with sweet, tangy, and smoky sauce. I saw them put the sauce on my sandwich – honestly, I did – and some of it even dripped onto the plate, but somehow it seemed to vanish into thin air as I ate it. As for the coleslaw, there was dressing on mine, but it wasn’t quite sour enough to be a superb vinegar-based slaw, nor was it smooth enough to be considered one of those satisfyingly creamy ones.

I don’t want to protest too much without offering what I think could be the saving grace for Drake BBQ. Three suggestions, if I may: up the ante on the sauce, spice it up and get it flowing more substantially; respectfully, if you don’t want a fryer in the joint, get really original with the coleslaw because I don’t want something that tastes like the grocery store stuff. I haven’t lost all of my hope for you, Drake BBQ. But, for now at least, one more star is all I can do.

Visually, Drake BBQ emanates a stereotypical southern eatery, including bullhorns and cowboy hat decor, a simple menu scrawled on a chalkboard and fizzy beverages in glass bottles that require a bottle opener to get into them. However, just like my meal, all the flavour is just at face value and none of that great flare infiltrates Drake BBQ where it counts – the food.

- Nicole

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La Revolucion

Posted on March 9, 2011 by in The Junction

2 stars

- La Revolucion is amazing! Well no, it isn’t, but that’s exactly how I wanted to start this off. Man, I really wanted to love this place. La Revolucion just looks so dam cool that I figured the whole experience was going to be amazing. When I was first drawn by the interesting front stained-glass window and poked my head inside to look around, I figured that in no-time-at-all, there’d be a lineup to get in. Sadly, I don’t think that’s going to be the case anytime soon.

La  Revolucion is a Mexican restaurant, but at first glance, it certainly doesn’t scream Mexican; after eating there, I’m not even sure if that’s what they’re going for. It’s a sparsely decorated joint that for some reason—at least while I was there—feels the need to distance themselves even more from their Mexican roots by blasting annoyingly loud rave music. I mean, their food is the typical, standard Mexican fare you’d expect, like enchiladas and tacos and burritos, but other than that and the few Mexican-esque decorations, there wasn’t much Mexican about it at all.

They’re heavily pushing the banditos aspect of Mexican culture, which is actually a pretty cool gimic in my eyes. While I get the whole concept of banditos and revolution, it seemed as though La Revolucion fell a little short of their delivery of the theme. While what little decor they have there is mostly bandito-related, the rest of the theme is left to interpretation. La Revolucion does feel as though they’re finding their identity, but they have a lot of difficulty conveying what that identity is exactly to their guests. Sitting there, it doesn’t feel as though you were part of the revolution, it feels as though you’re interrupting them while they plan it, and they can’t wait for you to leave so they can get back down to business.

Presentation isn’t their strong point either. They haphazardly slap the food down on the plate, without much concern for appearances. My enchiladas were slightly warm and covered in tasteless green salsa; my burrito was humungous, but it was bland and not nearly warm enough. When I asked for hot sauce, because it was nowhere to be found, I got a small ramekin with some sort of sauce, but it’s details remained a mystery that was left for me to find out with no explanation from the server, and while you’re waiting for that stuff to all arrive, there’s no offer of chips and salsa or even water for that matter, which would have definitely improved the experience.

Interestingly enough, before this place was a Mexican place it was, well, a Mexican place. Whoever it is that owns it probably just decided it was time to rebrand, and while that may have been a great idea on their part, the execution of their new brand and concept needs some polishing because it’s hard to tell exactly what the concept is. La Revolucion may be a restaurant, but a revolution it is not.

- AB

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Axis Gastropub

Posted on January 3, 2011 by in The Annex

2 stars

- Having grown up enjoying pubs far and wide, it doesn’t take much to cajole me into visiting the newest local for a pint and bite to eat. This was the case a few days back when a number of friends thought it would be fun to get together at Axis Gastropub on the corner of Bloor and Markham in Mirvish Village.

Axis sits in the old Rocco’s Plum Tomato location and is the sister pub to Axis Gallery and Grill in the Junction. This corner seems to be one of the those ‘Bermuda Triangle’ hospitality locations, with new establishments failing to get a foothold over and over again. Maybe the Axis folks will succeed where others have not.

Arriving, a number of us remarked that the large room, decorated in a modern style, was a little stark and very empty for the time of day. It certainly didn’t scream ‘Pub’.

Within seconds we were greeted by the two servers/bartenders and warmly directed to sit wherever we’d like. Both of these guys seemed genuinely happy to see us and quickly told us about the pint special for the day.

Taking a large table in the back of the room, we sat, chatted and waited for our drinks that soon appeared.

Perusing the menu, it was soon clear that this place was trying to please everyone. The choice was almost limitless with the usual pub fare coupled with ‘build your own’ pizzas and an entrees list that went from curries to fish and all the way back to steak and pasta.

At the server’s recommendation we tried the Pulled Pork Nachos. What came was a healthy portion topped with a mound of pork and all the normal nacho toppings. Tasty, but not remarkable in any way, and the amount of topping-less dead space at the bottom was quite disappointing. Hot wings soon appeared followed by a number of comments of: ‘Okay’, ‘Not stellar’, ‘Not that spicy’. Following another suggestion, my Axis Club sandwich soon arrived. A Pub staple, the clubhouse has almost as many variations as there are pubs. This club was well prepared, but again not remarkable. Combining chicken breast, ham and bacon on whole wheat bread it was pretty standard, much like what you’d find in a veteran diner or truck stop.

Overall, Axis Gastropub does not live up to its name. It doesn’t really feel like a Pub and there isn’t anything remarkable about the food. Maybe it is a case of higher expectations, but I can’t imagine returning when there are so many other better options nearby.

- Guest Contributor

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The Central

Posted on December 29, 2010 by in The Annex

2 stars

- Located in the Annex, in the middle of Mirvish Village, The Central is a bar, a restaurant, and a live music venue.  The dimly lit house-turned-restaurant with the splendidly seamy vibe immediately and completely tugged at my heart strings. I loved the rickety setting and little details like the “Draught: Use Your Eyes” sign behind the bar.

But, as with any new love, first impressions can often deceive you; The Central played with my emotions.  The menu – and be warned the online menu is not what you will find when you arrive there – has so much potential and I very much wanted the food to live up to my expectations.  My party of three shared grilled calamari with side of salad greens in a light citrus dressing, followed by entrees of grilled mushroom salad with shrimp, a grilled vegetable sandwich with sweet potato fries, and a cheesesteak sandwich with Tom Yum soup, all of which (with three beers) came in at just over $60.

The menu items are not very risky, but still need to be done carefully to be successful.  As much as I wanted everything to come out perfectly, it simply did not.  First of all, the calamari was a very large serving – so far, so good. But, in grilling it whole, the tips became overcooked and the centre remained undercooked, and there was a hint of burnt charcoal flavour.  The grilled vegetables were also overcooked, producing an all-over brown hue, making them completely lose their individuality.  The cheesesteak had the right flavour, but again, the beef was slightly overcooked and chewy.  Finally, after looking forward to trying one of the desserts in hopes for menu-redemption, like the candied strawberries or the ever-infamous deep fried Mars bars, we were told that all they had available was ice cream.  Not so impressive.

While the main dishes and lack of desserts were disappointing, I do have to commend them on a couple of things.  All of the side dishes were on-point; the dressing on both the calamari dish, and the mushroom salad were light, flavourful and had a good citrus tang; the sweet potato fries were crispy, and came with a side of a creamy cinnamon dip that was a great alternative to regular ketchup; and the Tom Yum soup was hot, spicy, and a great choice for a chilly December night.

I have decided that The Central could very well become a favourite spot of mine for drinks, and maybe appetizers, but is just not an ideal choice for a full dinner.  The venue itself is one that you should check out, and I expect it is only better when the patio is open in the summer.  If you don’t want to sit in the main bar to listen to the band they have a cozy lounge space upstairs that can be rented for private parties.  Also, they clearly take pride in the beverage menu, especially the beer choices.  When we had some trouble deciding on a pint, we were offered a sample of a new label on tap called Netherworld, a Flying Monkey brew, which is similar to the popular Mill St. Tankhouse Ale.

I give them an A+ for atmosphere, but only a gold star-for-effort on the menu.

- Nicole

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Grenadier Cafe

Posted on November 22, 2010 by in High Park

2 star

- If you’ve ever driven by High Park on Bloor street, seen the street-level sign that advertises 3 dollar breakfast, and considered stopping in to check it out, you’re probably lucky you didn’t. Sure, I know the breakfast is only 3 dollars, so I probably shouldn’t be hard on it; but regardless of price, I’d still like my meal to be served hot and be put together with some level of care and attention.

This is a pretty mediocre breakfast here: a slice of warm ham, a strip of old bacon, browned toast, over/undercooked eggs, leftover potatoes, breakfast served here is less-than-spectacular, and the service staff doesn’t seem to care if you complain about it; I’m sure they’ve heard it all countless times before.

All of this, of course, is served in one Toronto’s prized possessions, High Park. If it wasn’t for the location, I certainly would have given them 1 star. In fact, it wasn’t for the location, I probably wouldn’t have eaten there at all. And in some strange way, I almost wish I didn’t eat there. That way, the ad on Bloor street could have remained some mystical promise of a tasty, hot, and friendly-served breakfast somewhere in the heart of High Park.

- Andre

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Cool Hand of a Girl

Posted on November 18, 2010 by in The Junction

2 stars

- Cool Hand of a Girl offers simple and healthy food made with organic products, which has become what you’d expect from a place in the Junction as of late. Don’t get me wrong, I can appreciate how great I feel after a wholesome meal made with locally-sourced, pesticide-free food, but to me, one of the most important things that a restaurant can and should do is make their guests feel welcome. That’s where Cool Hand loses points.

Maybe it’s all part of the appeal for the artsy crowd you can expect to see, but Cool Hand can make you feel as if you’re an annoyance to them just for being there. So although I did enjoy my Chicken Tarragon sandwich, I just can’t see myself getting back there anytime soon, and somehow, I don’t think they’ll care.

- Andre

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